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Phillip Medhurst presents John’s Gospel: Bowyer Bible print 5659 Jesus appears to Thomas John 20 Kraussen

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A print from the Bowyer Bible, a grangerised copy of Macklin’s Bible in Bolton Museum and Archives, England.

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Phillip Medhurst presents engraving 20/20 by Sir John Everett Millais from “The Parables of Our Lord” : The Prodigal Son

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In 1857 Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896) agreed to provide the Dalziel Brothers engravers with a series of drawings to illustrate “The Parables of Our Lord,” a book whose moral appeal was to be supported by the beauty of its illustrations. The resulting 20 prints first appeared in the periodicals “Good Words,” “Once a Week,” and “The Cornhill Magazine” during 1862–63, and the Dalziels considered the series, published together in 1864, to be amongst their finest work. Millais created numerous drafts of each image and considered the process of illustrating the “Parables” equal to the compositional complexities of executing a painting.

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Phillip Medhurst presents engraving 19/20 by Sir John Everett Millais from “The Parables of Our Lord” : The Unmerciful Servant

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In 1857 Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896) agreed to provide the Dalziel Brothers engravers with a series of drawings to illustrate “The Parables of Our Lord,” a book whose moral appeal was to be supported by the beauty of its illustrations. The resulting 20 prints first appeared in the periodicals “Good Words,” “Once a Week,” and “The Cornhill Magazine” during 1862–63, and the Dalziels considered the series, published together in 1864, to be amongst their finest work. Millais created numerous drafts of each image and considered the process of illustrating the “Parables” equal to the compositional complexities of executing a painting.

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Phillip Medhurst presents engraving 18/20 by Sir John Everett Millais from “The Parables of Our Lord” : The Wicked Husbandmen

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In 1857 Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896) agreed to provide the Dalziel Brothers engravers with a series of drawings to illustrate “The Parables of Our Lord,” a book whose moral appeal was to be supported by the beauty of its illustrations. The resulting 20 prints first appeared in the periodicals “Good Words,” “Once a Week,” and “The Cornhill Magazine” during 1862–63, and the Dalziels considered the series, published together in 1864, to be amongst their finest work. Millais created numerous drafts of each image and considered the process of illustrating the “Parables” equal to the compositional complexities of executing a painting.

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Phillip Medhurst presents engraving 17/20 by Sir John Everett Millais from “The Parables of Our Lord” : The Importunate Friend

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In 1857 Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896) agreed to provide the Dalziel Brothers engravers with a series of drawings to illustrate “The Parables of Our Lord,” a book whose moral appeal was to be supported by the beauty of its illustrations. The resulting 20 prints first appeared in the periodicals “Good Words,” “Once a Week,” and “The Cornhill Magazine” during 1862–63, and the Dalziels considered the series, published together in 1864, to be amongst their finest work. Millais created numerous drafts of each image and considered the process of illustrating the “Parables” equal to the compositional complexities of executing a painting.

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Phillip Medhurst presents engraving 16/20 by Sir John Everett Millais from “The Parables of Our Lord” : The Lost Piece of Silver

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In 1857 Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896) agreed to provide the Dalziel Brothers engravers with a series of drawings to illustrate “The Parables of Our Lord,” a book whose moral appeal was to be supported by the beauty of its illustrations. The resulting 20 prints first appeared in the periodicals “Good Words,” “Once a Week,” and “The Cornhill Magazine” during 1862–63, and the Dalziels considered the series, published together in 1864, to be amongst their finest work. Millais created numerous drafts of each image and considered the process of illustrating the “Parables” equal to the compositional complexities of executing a painting.

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Phillip Medhurst presents engraving 15/20 by Sir John Everett Millais from “The Parables of Our Lord” : The Sower

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In 1857 Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896) agreed to provide the Dalziel Brothers engravers with a series of drawings to illustrate “The Parables of Our Lord,” a book whose moral appeal was to be supported by the beauty of its illustrations. The resulting 20 prints first appeared in the periodicals “Good Words,” “Once a Week,” and “The Cornhill Magazine” during 1862–63, and the Dalziels considered the series, published together in 1864, to be amongst their finest work. Millais created numerous drafts of each image and considered the process of illustrating the “Parables” equal to the compositional complexities of executing a painting.